Rediscover Pulp Magazines

Rediscover Pulp Magazines

Pulp magazines were inexpensive fiction magazines that were published from 1896 to the late 1950s.

Pulp magazines were inexpensive fiction magazines that were published from 1896 to the late 1950s. They were printed on cheap wood pulp paper, and came in various sizes, including 7 inches wide by 10 inches high (about 18 cm by 25 cm) and 0.5 inches thick; some pulps were larger or smaller than this format. Pulps frequently featured adventure stories and genre fiction; however, they also contained many different types of stories such as romance novels, mysteries, westerns and science fiction tales. The name “pulp” comes from the material used for their pages: cheap wood pulp paper made from tree fibers instead of cotton or linen rags when regular newsprint became too expensive during World War II because of wartime shortages created by World War I as well as other conflicts between nations at this point in history such as The Great Depression which occurred during 1929-1939 where many people lost jobs due to banks failing causing them not being able to afford anything including food so the government had put laws into place called New Deal Policies which helped people get back on their feet again because there was no more running out of money before payday came around like before these laws went into effect!

The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed.

The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. Pulps were considered “pulp fiction” because they used low-quality materials, such as newsprint (which was considered to be a cheap and inferior form of paper).

In contrast, magazines printed on higher-quality paper were called “glossies” or “slicks.”

As the name suggests, pulp magazines were printed on cheap paper. They were also known as “the pulps” because of the quality of their paper. The use of pulp in printing goes back to antiquity and is used today in many industries such as packaging, absorbent materials and filter papers.

In contrast, magazines printed on higher-quality art paper were called “glossies” or “slicks.” The term “slick” was used because slick magazines had a high gloss finish that made them look like polished metal. Glossy magazine covers often featured color photographs or illustrations rather than black-and-white drawings or line art common in most pulps

The typical pulp magazine had 128 pages; it was 7 inches wide by 10 inches high, and 0.5 inches thick, with ragged, untrimmed edges.

The typical pulp magazine had 128 pages; it was 7 inches wide by 10 inches high, and 0.5 inches thick, with ragged, untrimmed edges. It was bound together in a saddle-stitched binding (staples on the side) or glued along the spine — but not always. The covers were usually painted illustrations of good guys shooting at bloodthirsty villains from a distance, but sometimes they were artwork from other sources: pirated artworks from other magazines or film posters for movies that hadn’t been released yet (this practice is called “screening”).

The typical pulp story had its beginnings in serialized fiction popularized by Charles Dickens’ novels of the mid-1800s — stories told over several issues before being collected into one volume at the end of their run. Pulps were cheap and accessible to ordinary people; they could be found in drug stores and newsstands across America until they went out of style after World War II.

The pulps gave rise to the term pulp fiction in reference to run-of-the-mill, low-quality literature.

Pulp magazines were the first to publish stories by authors such as H.P. Lovecraft and Edgar Allan Poe, Isaac Asimov and Robert Heinlein. The term “pulp fiction” refers to run-of-the-mill low-quality literature, but there is a nice irony in the fact that so many great writers got their start with pulp magazines.

Pulp Magazines were cheap fiction that was published in the first half of the 20th Century.

Pulp Magazines were a type of cheap fiction that was published in the first half of the 20th century. They were printed on inexpensive wood pulp paper, which was cheaper than paper made from cotton or linen rags. Because of this, pulps had a reputation for being low-quality or even trashy, which is why they’re often called “pulp fiction”.